Solar beats gas and wind as the biggest source of new electricity in the U.S.

Solar power in U.S. climbed 13 percent in first quarter, SEIA says


A solar installer attaching a panel to a roof /Archive

Showing resiliency in spite of the new tariffs on imported modules, the U.S. solar market added 2.5 gigawatts of solar PV in the first quarter of the year, representing annual growth of 13 percent, according to the latest U.S. Solar Market Insight Report from GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA).

Solar PV accounted for 55 percent of all U.S. electricity capacity added during the quarter and added more than two gigawatts for the 10th straight quarter.

Overall, the report estimates that solar’s growth in 2018 will mirror 2017’s 10.6 GW before growing more robustly in 2019 and then accelerating in the early 2020s.

The non-residential solar segment posted its fourth-highest installation total ever, with 509 megawatts installed. This represents year-over-year growth of 23 percent.

Community solar continues to be a strong driver of non-residential solar demand. Minnesota alone added more than 100 MW of community solar in Q1. The report says the U.S. has now surpassed 1 cumulative gigawatt of community solar capacity.

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