This week’s trending solar stories—July 6th, 2017

For the first time in decades, the United States got more electricity from renewable sources than nuclear power in March and April.


WASHINGTON POST

Renewable energy surges past nuclear for 1st time in decades
The U.S. Energy Information Administration said Thursday that electricity production from utility-scale renewable sources exceeded nuclear generation in both March and April, the most recent months for which data is available. That’s the first time renewable sources have outpaced nuclear since 1984.

The growth in renewables was fueled by scores of new wind turbines and solar farms, as well as recent increases in hydroelectric power as a result of heavy snow and rain in Western states last winter. More than 60 percent of all utility-scale electricity generating capacity that came online last year was from wind and solar.

BLOOMBERG

Renewables Top Nukes in U.S. Power Mix for First Time Since 1984
In March and April, U.S. power from utility-scale renewables topped output from reactors for the first time since July 1984, according to a U.S. Energy Information Administration report. Supplies from wind and solar rose to a record, while heavy rains in the West boosted hydroelectric power and nuclear generation dropped to the lowest monthly level since April 2014.

Though President Donald Trump announced plans last month to review U.S. nuclear energy policy, the surge of renewable power signals that reviving the flagging industry will be a complex and costly endeavor. Amid competition from renewables and abundant natural gas from shale basins, more than half of America’s reactors are losing money, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. That’s prompted states including New York and Illinois to pass legislation clearing the way for nuclear subsidies.

SEEKING ALPHA

Renewable electricity tops nuclear in U.S. for first time since 1984
Nuclear plants have fallen behind renewable energy suppliers including wind farms and solar panels as a source of electricity in the U.S. for the first time in more than 30 years, the Energy Information Administration reports.

U.S. power from utility-scale renewables in March and April exceeded output from reactors for the first time since July 1984, while supplies from wind and solar rose to a record and nuclear generation dropped to the lowest monthly level since April 2014, the EIA says.

MY SAN ANTONIO

Renewables top nukes in U.S. power mix for first time since 1984
For the first time in more than 30 years, America’s nuclear plants have fallen behind wind farms, solar panels and other renewable energy suppliers as a source of electricity.

In March and April, U.S. power from utility-scale renewables topped output from reactors for the first time since July 1984, according to a U.S. Energy Information Administration report. Supplies from wind and solar rose to a record, while heavy rains in the West boosted hydroelectric power and nuclear generation dropped to the lowest monthly level since April 2014.

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